Three Famous Marble Statues

Throughout history, marble has been one of the most common materials used in sculptures.

Famed for its shimmery beauty – as well as its durability and translucency – it was the medium of choice for some of the world’s greatest sculptors, including Ancient Greeks such as Myron and Polykleitos and artists of the Renaissamce such as Michelangelo and Donatello.

In this blog post we’re going to look at three of the most famous marble statues.

Venus de Milo

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Created sometime between 100 and 130 BC, the Venus de Milo sculpture, which was carved from at least six blocks of Parian marble, is believed to depict Aphrodite, the Ancient Greek goddess of love and beauty (or Venus to the Romans).

Standing at six foot eight inches, it is one of the famous works to come out of Ancient Greece, due in part to the mystery surrounding its missing arms, which, along with the statue’s original plinth, were lost following its discovery on the Greek island of Milos.

The Venus de Milo is currently housed in the Louvre Museum in Paris.

Pieta

The Pieta sculpture was created by Michelangelo and it depicts the dead body of Jesus Christ being cradled by the Virgin Mary.

Constructed between 1498 and 1499, the Pieta is constructed from a single slab of Carrara marble, and it is widely regarded as one of the most beautiful sculptures ever created.

It is currently housed in St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican City.

The Kiss

The Kiss is a marble sculpture created by French sculptor Auguste Rodin in 1889.

It was originally entitled Francesca da Rimini, as it depicts the selfsame Italian noblewoman from Dante’s Inferno who falls in love with her husband’s brother, Pablo.

In the story, the couple are found out by Francesca’s husband Giovanni and killed, and the statue has their lips not yet touching, suggesting they met their demise before they were able to even share a kiss.